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Animal behavior

Oxytocin-deficient animals point to deep links between social behavior and the need to keep warm.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Image of raccoon dog, also known as a tanuki, on a brown grass field, looking at the camera

Social behavior of beloved "trickster" dogs may be changing due to human activity.

Joshua Learn, Contributor

Long penises may allow hermit crabs to stay in their shells during sex, reducing the risk of shells being stolen.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Successful ants play like the Borg from Star Trek.

Joel Shurkin, Contributor

Animals famous for walking up walls can also use a combination of techniques to race across water.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Omnivores' diets may depend on the amount of salt in their environments.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

New research may explain why some cloven-hoofed animals have tusks instead of horns or antlers.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Dogs successfully detected malaria parasites in infected children by sniffing their socks.

Tracy Staedter, Contributor

Researchers call in feathered helpers to spread the seeds of endangered plants.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

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