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Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

Mountains and forested slopes surround cloudy blue water of a reservoir

People who eat fish from glacial meltwater may be at risk from persistent organic pollutants produced in the 20th century.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Morning light over the city skyline of Copenhagen with a power plant in the background.

Sediment core from a Copenhagen lake tells the story of the Industrial Revolution.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Considering humidity as well as temperature emphasizes humanity's impact on the climate.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

The most modern aircraft and most direct route are not always the most environmentally friendly options for air travel.

Kimberly Hickok, Contributor

The science and technology of taking pictures of tiny snowflakes in the early 1900s.

Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer

Study shows that climate-skeptic bloggers often use limited disagreements to cast doubt on the big picture.

Gabriel Popkin, Contributor

Rainstorms deposit sediment that hampers the effects of sunlight on lakes and rivers.

Joel Shurkin, Contributor

Researchers look at what’s in soil to help farmers improve crops and their lives.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

Citizen scientists confirm that plastic pollution is blemishing previously pristine beaches in the Arctic Ocean.

Kimberly Hickok, Contributor

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