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Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

Green plant could help clean up heavy metal contamination at industrial sites.

Brian Owens, Contributor

Soil bacteria are staggeringly diverse, but a few types are abundant nearly everywhere.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Scientists battle fires with science.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

The solution flowing through the Keystone pipeline isn't just crude oil. Scientists are now learning what that means for spills.

Brian Owens, Contributor

Nitrogen isotopes show how nutrients leach out of septic tanks and into pond ecosystems.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

An exceptionally strong El Niño may have caused 1876-1878 famine that killed tens of millions.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Mountains and forested slopes surround cloudy blue water of a reservoir

People who eat fish from glacial meltwater may be at risk from persistent organic pollutants produced in the 20th century.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Morning light over the city skyline of Copenhagen with a power plant in the background.

Sediment core from a Copenhagen lake tells the story of the Industrial Revolution.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Considering humidity as well as temperature emphasizes humanity's impact on the climate.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

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