Skip to content Skip to navigation

Physics

Let there be light, sound, fluids and quantum weirdness

We love physics in all its forms, from new research on mind-bending concepts like quantum weirdness and spooky action at a distance to the science of sounds and fluids to all the forces that push, pull, stick and slip. Here we tackle the macroscopic, the subatomic, the strange, the cool, the groundbreaking and the obscure.

Scientists discovered that water droplets don’t just passively roll around on a hot skillet.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

The physics of tumbling fibers may be useful for applications from paper manufacturing to the study of plankton in the ocean.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The technique could help scientists better understand why certain materials have the properties they do.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Researchers found that adding a full twist made it possible to break spaghetti in half.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Theoretical physicists come up with a new way to analyze the firework of signals coming from particle collision experiments.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The game-changing scientific device you've never heard of.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Physicists speculate that decaying neutrons may be producing particles unknown to science that make up the elusive dark matter.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Scientists have just found out that zinc sulfide, a relatively common semiconductor material, becomes pliable when kept in the dark.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Physicists are looking inside atoms on Earth to learn more about mysterious neutron stars thousands of light-years away.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Subscribe to Physics