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Physics

Let there be light, sound, fluids and quantum weirdness

We love physics in all its forms, from new research on mind-bending concepts like quantum weirdness and spooky action at a distance to the science of sounds and fluids to all the forces that push, pull, stick and slip. Here we tackle the macroscopic, the subatomic, the strange, the cool, the groundbreaking and the obscure.

Optical tweezers developed by a new Nobel laureate could potentially be used on slightly larger objects, but not spacecraft.

Ramin Skibba, Contributor

Optical innovations made by the three new laureates help scientists control tiny organisms and make incredibly short and powerful laser pulses.

Catherine Meyers, Editor

Certain types of research and people have been historically underrepresented in the ranks of Nobel winners.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Defects in crystals may be useful for designing spintronic devices, which use the magnetic properties of electrons for processing information.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Physicists harness ultrasound to make bubbles last longer.

Marcus Woo, Contributor

Scientists discovered that water droplets don’t just passively roll around on a hot skillet.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

The physics of tumbling fibers may be useful for applications from paper manufacturing to the study of plankton in the ocean.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The technique could help scientists better understand why certain materials have the properties they do.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Researchers found that adding a full twist made it possible to break spaghetti in half.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

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