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Physics

Let there be light, sound, fluids and quantum weirdness

We love physics in all its forms, from new research on mind-bending concepts like quantum weirdness and spooky action at a distance to the science of sounds and fluids to all the forces that push, pull, stick and slip. Here we tackle the macroscopic, the subatomic, the strange, the cool, the groundbreaking and the obscure.

Researchers use computer simulations to learn how water forms different kinds of ice.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Even some of the most powerful explosions in the universe might be explained by the collision of magnetic fields.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

New study on how cans crumple sheds light on general mechanical properties of metal cylinders.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Two experiments test a 50-year-old theory on particles that move in a straight line.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Researchers' experiment could test concepts of quantum gravity and reveal a potential key to a "theory of everything."

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Researchers investigate one of the classic physics lessons, substituting liquids for solids.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

Redesigned guitar strings use physics to avoid whammy bar dissonance.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Remembering Joseph Weber, whose failure to detect gravitational waves helped lead to their discovery.

Joel Shurkin, Contributor

The experiment behind this year’s winner for the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

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