Skip to content Skip to navigation

Culture

The unexpected science of everyday things

Science is a mirror that reveals sometimes hidden, often unexpected and always astounding insights into everyday things and human life. Here we explore everything you always wanted to know about holidays, food, art, music, books, games, TV, film, education, urban life and crime — as well as human history, archaeology and anthropology.

Drought-tolerant ingredients and local sourcing of brewing containers meant the beer could flow even in tough times.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Fossils from 50,000-67,000 years ago represent Homo luzonensis, discovered in a cave on the island of Luzon.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

New tools are creating a trend in archaeology research: excavation without digging.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

Analysis of trash mounds shows how a regional hub collapsed after the onset of the Late Antiquity Little Ice Age.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Ancestors of modern humans may have scavenged calorie-rich bone marrow from already dead animals.

Thomas Garlinghouse, Contributor

Ensuring a pot of the famous melted cheese dish has the right material properties is key to enjoying it.

Catherine Meyers, Editor

A New York district judge weighs in on using forensic science evidence in the courtroom.

Chris Gorski, Editor

Image of several large stones standing upright near the seashore.

New research suggests the idea of stone megaliths was spread by a mysterious seafaring culture from northwest France.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

New research suggests that the language you speak may affect how you form memories -- even when the memory has nothing to do with words.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Subscribe to Culture