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Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

The Saffir-Simpson scale relies on wind to categorize a hurricane, but it doesn't account for storm surge or flooding.

Sofie Bates, Contributor

Picture shows a snowy field with mountains in the background.

Researchers in Antarctica turned up a large amount of a form of iron likely forged in nearby supernova explosions.

Ramin Skibba, Contributor

Heat is the number one cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

New research finds plastic particles in Arctic snow, in amounts that surprise scientists.

Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor

Photo shows a stream in the foreground as a forest fire burns on a mountainside.

A new study links increased temperatures caused by climate change to California's worsening wildfire problem.

Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor

What goes down our drains could harm the environment.

Sofie Bates, Contributor

A low angle shot of seal atop the sea ice. It has been equipped with a sensor.

These massive holes in the ice, known as polynyas, may appear more often as climate change advances.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

If we were on track to curb climate change, methane levels would be dropping. Instead, they are spiking.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

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