Skip to content Skip to navigation

Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

New research adds to the worry that soil microbes will make climate change worse.

Gabriel Popkin, Contributor

Preventing losses of electricity as it travels from the source to where it's used could cut greenhouse gas emissions by half a billion metric tons a year.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Scientists now know much more about the underground cavities in the sand that nearly killed a boy in 2013.

Catherine Meyers, Editor

Sandy beach with cabanas, sunbathers, and piles of sargassum, as a man moves a wheelbarrow full of the seaweed.

Researchers are learning how to cope with the arrival of the sargassum’s “brown tide."

Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor

The Saffir-Simpson scale relies on wind to categorize a hurricane, but it doesn't account for storm surge or flooding.

Sofie Bates, Contributor

Picture shows a snowy field with mountains in the background.

Researchers in Antarctica turned up a large amount of a form of iron likely forged in nearby supernova explosions.

Ramin Skibba, Contributor

Heat is the number one cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

New research finds plastic particles in Arctic snow, in amounts that surprise scientists.

Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor

Subscribe to Earth