Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

Scientists set out to investigate how these unusual structures form.
Katharine Gammon, Contributor
Iron-laden particles fertilized areas of the ocean thousands of kilometers away.
Charles Q. Choi, Contributor
A better understanding of the physics of storm formation may lead to more accurate forecasts.
Charles Q. Choi, Contributor
A new study can help the city plant better trees.
Krystal Vasquez, Contributor
We can't put Earth on a scale, but there are other ways to figure out the weight of our world.
Inside Science Contributor
A new model, based on "sea glass" from ocean ridges, may help scientists more easily answer a question they have long struggled with.
Tom Metcalfe, Contributor
As climate change melts away frozen landscapes, scientists rush to discover all they can about the tiny organisms that thrive on ice.
James Gaines, Contributor
New research shows the climate effects likely varied widely around the globe, with the Northern Hemisphere suffering the most.
Charles Q. Choi, Contributor
Scientists study how some microorganisms deep on the ocean floor affect our climate.
Inside Science Contributor
The accuracy of the next season's weather forecast dives every spring, because of the volatility of Pacific Ocean conditions.
Carolina Cuellar, Contributor
Scientists link the start of movements in the Earth's crust to increasing amounts of aluminum in crystals about 3.6 billion years ago.
James Gaines, Contributor
This month in pictures
Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator