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Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

A low angle shot of seal atop the sea ice. It has been equipped with a sensor.

These massive holes in the ice, known as polynyas, may appear more often as climate change advances.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

If we were on track to curb climate change, methane levels would be dropping. Instead, they are spiking.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

New research shows how decommissioned oil rigs can become home to an abundance of fish and invertebrates.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

A month's worth of cool science stories summed up.

Alistair Jennings, Contributor

The so-called Great Whirl off the coast of Somalia is larger and lasts longer than scientists thought.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Understanding how seemingly solid rocks get squished could make mining and construction projects safer.

Rebecca Boyle, Contributor

High-speed video shows how far one drop of water really goes.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

Researchers find that hot ash, lava, boulders and gas can rush from a volcano at high speeds on a cushion of air.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Repercussions of human pressure ripple from the edges to the center of an enormous protected area.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

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