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Earth

Moving and shaking for 4.5 billion years

The physical processes that sculpt our Earth are dramatic — earthquakes, weather, volcanic eruptions, tectonic motions, climate change. Now, decades of research into the intricately intertwined system that links all oceans and freshwater, the atmosphere and our land is moving us forward toward a better understanding of our world. Here we watch it unfold.

The first fracking-induced earthquake to claim human lives shows why magnitude may underestimate the danger such earthquakes pose.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Superbolts unleash a thousand times more energy than typical lightning.

Emilie Lorditch, Contributor

Researchers examined some of the oldest rocks in western Greenland to probe the beginnings of today’s continents.

Ramin Skibba, Contributor

Bacteria help drive Earth's chemical cycles and climate. Viruses drive the bacteria.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

International efforts, including the Paris agreement, may not be able to solve the climate change crisis on their own.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The water contains bacterialike shapes that researchers plan to test for DNA.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Climate change may cause trees to live faster and die younger, releasing their carbon into the atmosphere.

Gabriel Popkin, Contributor

People in a hall. The walls are covered in images of people, horses, archers, and decorations.

New data sheds light on the impact of an ancient drought.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

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