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Physics

Let there be light, sound, fluids and quantum weirdness

We love physics in all its forms, from new research on mind-bending concepts like quantum weirdness and spooky action at a distance to the science of sounds and fluids to all the forces that push, pull, stick and slip. Here we tackle the macroscopic, the subatomic, the strange, the cool, the groundbreaking and the obscure.

Scientists describe a physical system that is both below “absolute zero” and above “absolute hot” at the same time.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Researchers provide a blueprint for a tiny device that can control the direction of light.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Vital work by scientists leads to one of the most important physics experiments in history.

Karin Heineman, Executive Producer

Researchers use computer simulations to learn how water forms different kinds of ice.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Even some of the most powerful explosions in the universe might be explained by the collision of magnetic fields.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

New study on how cans crumple sheds light on general mechanical properties of metal cylinders.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Two experiments test a 50-year-old theory on particles that move in a straight line.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Researchers' experiment could test concepts of quantum gravity and reveal a potential key to a "theory of everything."

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Researchers investigate one of the classic physics lessons, substituting liquids for solids.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

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