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Physics

Let there be light, sound, fluids and quantum weirdness

We love physics in all its forms, from new research on mind-bending concepts like quantum weirdness and spooky action at a distance to the science of sounds and fluids to all the forces that push, pull, stick and slip. Here we tackle the macroscopic, the subatomic, the strange, the cool, the groundbreaking and the obscure.

New findings suggest that ordinary sound has negative gravitational mass.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Researchers use machine learning to speed up the trial-and-error search for new materials that can conduct electricity without resistance.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Evidence of dark matter particles may be easier to find in ancient minerals than in the newest detectors.

Ramin Skibba, Contributor

Super slow-motion video reveals the microscopic details of how tape peels.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The image shows two clear, water-filled balls sparking while they are being microwaved.

Physicists figured out why grapes and water-filled beads make sparks in the microwave.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

The end-of-the-year cool science stories summed up.

Alistair Jennings, Contributor

A new way to measure vibrations may eventually help detect gravitational waves and store quantum memory.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Scientists have developed a way to encourage a single electron to hop atop a silicon atom, a feat that may find applications in future nanoscale electronics.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The revolutionary discovery allowed engineers to build cheaper hard drives with higher storage capacity.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

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